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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
conservative, conservative on foreign policy and military policy, and on social issues we would be libertarian. i think that party could be a majority party. >> a party in search of voters. that's next. ♪ [ male announcer ] a european-inspired suspension, but not from germany. ♪ a powerful, fuel-efficient engine, but it's not from japan. ♪ it's a car like no other... inspired by a place like no other. introducing the all-new 2013 chevrolet malibu, our greatest malibu ever. ♪ perform, compete and grow. and people are driving this change. that's the power of human resources. the society... for human resource management and its members know... how to harness that power, because we help develop it. from the next economy, to the next generation, we help get... the most out of business, by getting the best out of people. shrm. leading people, leading organizations. starts with arthritis pain and a choice. take tylenol or take aleve, the #1 recommended pain reliever by orthopedic doctors. just two aleve can keep pain away all day. back to the news. just two aleve can keep pain away all day. i
happens less than a year later. and the foreign policy effects and the economic effects which we are still living. so we don't really know because history's like this what the real number one foreign policy is going to be. we can guess. we have educated guesses but things happen that we don't anticipate. that's where the arab spring. september 11 and its implicatns. wouljust argue that's why the character of whoever wins this election is so important. foreign policy, as clinical as we want it to be in many ways is a human undertaking. >> rose: this is very important. what do you mean by character. help us understand what character has to do in terms of what are we talking about. character with respect to the presidency. >> i think we saw in 2001 we had a president who had a stubborn streak, who had, was in a way radicalized by events in the autumn of 2001. >> rose: 9/11. >> he was against nation building before he was in favor of it. and because of the effects of that we are living in a world which is radically different. the great example would be world war ii where fdr said i'm a jugul
be a republican party that was fiscally conservative, conservative on foreign policy and military policy, and on social issues we would be libertarian. i think that party could be a majority party. >> a party -- the power of aspirin plus more in a triple action formula to relieve your tough migraines. new bayer migraine formula. [ male announcer ] a european-inspired suspension, but not from germany. ♪ a powerful, fuel-efficient engine, but it's not from japan. ♪ it's a car like no other... inspired by a place like no other. introducing the all-new 2013 chevrolet malibu, our greatest malibu ever. ♪ let's say you want to get ahead how do you get from here... to here? at university of phoenix we're moving career planning forward so you can start figuring that out sooner. ln fact, by thinking about where want your education to lead, while you're still in school, you might find the best route... leads somewhere you weren't even looking. let's get to work. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 you know, the one that's been lying around. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 rollover your old 401(k)
.0 with respect to our foreign policy on israel and iran? because you had been sounding alarm bells about how the sanctions weren't going to do it, iran is moving towards a nuclear bomb, and if we don't step up the sanctions severely or do something else, you know, they're going to wind up with a nuke, or israel's going to act militarily? where do you see us now? >> well, i don't think anything has changed just because of our election on tuesday. i think the most likely outcome in the middle east remains that iran will get nuclear weapons unless israel or the united states acts militarily. i see zero chance the obama administration will do that, so people are necessarily concentrating on israel. i think president obama will put merciless pressure on israel not to use military force. i think he will try to affect the outcome of the israeli election in january and do what he can to make sure netanyahu's not reelected. that could include a very public discussion with iran bilaterally, it could include behind-the-scenes pressure. but i think the stakes are very high here. megyn: i want to talk to
director and i'm delighted to see all of you here today. i think the interest in foreign policy in the wake of other presidential election is certainly evident by the standing room only crowd that we have here today. we are now already into the process of transition. transition even with the same president. transitions are the most fluid and receptive moments in the presidential cycle to have an impact on the policy process. and so i'm, i take it, as a good sign there is so much interest in the foreign policy process by your presence here today. now i think that the transition from a first to a second obama administration may of course begin the day after an election but it doesn't end on inauguration day. this process is going to continue for some time. as the president's new or old team takes shape and where necessary seeks confirmation. as the new old team goes through the inevitable period of reassessment and redefinition of priorities and opportunities, and as other issues, domestic issues, fiscal cliff, for example, impacts foreign policy, and let's not forget as the world recalibrate
, 20 individuals with long experience in the intelligence foreign policy, national security arena, who serve as a sounding word and resource for the director about -- board and resource for the director about issues the agency is facing. we meet quarterly. leon panetta started this. general petraeus carried ton. we review a variety of issues and offer our thoughts to the direct quor for whatever they are worth. host: let's move on to, then, the fiscal issue. the so-called fiscal cliff. lots of stories in the papers today that president obama's meeting with labor leaders who are insisting that the president not change entitlements. no cuts to medicare and social security. do you agree? guest: i think some adjustments are going to have to be made. social security today is a lot different than it was when franklin roosevelt first instituted it. it's not as if it's etched in stone. that said, it's got to be a balanced approach. i think that's what the president is going to say. the two actually save the entitlement programs the nation is on the road to bankruptcy, to save them we have to m
in their programming ucla. our coverage begins at 1:00 p.m. eastern followed by a speech on foreign policy. this'll be his third time speaking since becoming prime minister. then later, be no rennae talks about social enterprise. -- bono talks about social and a price. host: we want to welcome the former lieutenant governor of maryland michael steele welcome back to c-span. what happened tuesday guest: i think from the democrats perspective they got an affirmation of the policies and the direction that the president articulated. as a i would say there wasn't much articulation there but they showed they are spoir in getting their vote to the table and with the pick up in the senate i think a lot of people kind of looked at the senate as one of those fire walls that the republicans needed to pick up two seats was a profound effort as well. and it really makes the policy discussion take on a very different hugh than it otherwise would. and i think for the republicans it was one of those come to jesus 340e789s politically where they have to reassess and evaluate whether they want to be a relevant p
, and foreign policy, embracing each one of those. what we had was one wobbly leg. with $1 billion provided on the republican side. from the top of the ticket and affecting every other senate race in the country because of that influence. when fully engaged, each of those policy areas are mandated and created and there is a residence on the ground -- grass-roots level brings public policy leaders into office so those three areas can be implemented without fully engaging on aid to those areas and on social policy, we leave boats on the -- votes on the table every single time. we had a defect a truce on social issues on one side but the full embrace of the war on social issues on the other side. republicans had the truth, obama had launched a war over abortion. and on the life issue. and he got to define what that issue was and what is it? rape. abortion meant rape in the minds of many voters because the debate was not fully engaged. his weaknesses, his extreme positions on late term abortions, on sex selection abortion, not saving children born after a failed abortion, none of these were exp
serious stuff. iran is firing on a u.s. drone. just the latest foreign policy skirmish for the white house to deal with. what other challenges will the president need to address overseas in the next four years? might be with a new secretary of state. who should have the reins of the department of defense, the cia? that and more with four-star general jack keane. he will give his insight straight ahead. is what drives us to broadcast the world's biggest events in 3d, or live to your seat high above the atlantic ocean. it's what drives us to create eco-friendly race tracks, batteries that power tomorrow's cars, nearlyndestructible laptops, and the sustainable smart towns of the future. at panasonic, we're driven to make what matters most better. just another way we're engineering a better world for you. jamie: well new next hour, thousands of people still without power after superstorm sandy. what needs to be done to prevent widespread outages when that next storm hits? >>> united airlines flight crew calls for help in route to washington, d.c. military jets had to escort the plane to safety
part of the 20th century would bring us a major financial crisis and engulf us in a foreign policy that would overextend us and undermine our national security. to achieve these goals i thought the government would have had to shrink in size and scope, reduce spending, change the monetary system, and reject the unsustainable cost of policing the world and expanding the american empire. the problems seemed to be overwhelming and impossible to solve, yet from my viewpoint, just following the constraints based on the federal government by the constitution would have been a good place to start. just how much did i accomplish? in more ways according to conventional viss wisdom my off and on career in congress from 1976 to 2012, accomplished very little. no named legislation, no named federal buildings or highways, thank goodness. in spite of my efforts the government has grown exponentially, taxes remain excessive, and a prolific increase of incomprehensible regulations continues. wars are constant, and pursued without congressional declaration, deficits rise to the sky, poverty is ramp
of a winning republican strategy. social policy, economic policy, and foreign policy, fully embracing each one of those. what we have instead was one wobbly leg with about $1 billion behind it on the republican side from the top of the ticket and affecting every other senate race in the country because of the influence. when fully engaged, each of those policy areas, our real mandate created and a resident on the grass roots level that brings public policy leaders into office of those three areas can be implemented without fully in beijing on each of those area and social policy. we the boats on the table every single time. what we had unfortunately was a de facto truce on social issues. of the factor troops on social issues on one side, but a full embrace of the war on social issues on the other side. republicans have the true. obama launched the war over abortion and on the life issue. therefore he got to completely define what that issue was and what is rape. abortion and grape in the minds of many voters, because the debate was not fully engage. the president's weaknesses, his extreme posi
an article calling the other fiscal cliff as foreign policy. the shake up on the foreign relations committees -- three of the chair and a ranking member being gone but if senator kerry would move positions it would be a complete clean slate on how often set aside and wondering how it affects the president's ability to build up the top line foreign policy issues, like syria and iran, but also others like foreign aid which has a nice rubber duckie on the catalog today. it helps pay our salaries. >> i think bob corker will be interesting as ranking member on foreign relations. he skipped the republican convention this summer to go to the middle east. and he has been doing a lot of traveling. he is super smart about these kinds of things. i think he will try to mold himself a little bit -- not completely, like dick lugar, honestly. he will be against the hawks i think on a number of occasions. we did a story recently about him and we had john mccain talk about how much -- how much he respected and although they did not always see eye to eye. but i think the foreign relations panel in both chamber
partisan than i thought it would be including matters on foreign policy. it felt it first on the debate of the resolution to authorize president bush to go into kuwait to get hussein out. along the way, there have been many great moments of bipartisan achievement, and, in fact, i would say that of all of things i'm feeling good about that i've been a part of in the 24 years i've been in the senate, not a one of them have been partisan. .. >> be effective that is that you get 0%. >> senator kyl what happened? why this happened? >> forgive me for doing this, but think you doing this and thank you to "the wall street journal" for making this possible. mr. murdoch, it's great have a chance to visit with you. mr. prime minister, i haven't had a chance to visit with him as of yet. he is very good at this. i'm thinking about running for reelection. [laughter] john mccain and joe lieberman. the reason that joe came back -- what a wonderful lady she is. >> have you finished your rounds? >> a have to do that because i do appreciate this opportunity. i came to the congress in 1972 as a young fresh
in the christian conservative community. it does seem, to me, to have evolved. can you talk about foreign policy or gay individuals and how the christian community is now or conservative christian community is looking at those issues? >> yeah. i mean, we're still looking at the postelection survey that we, um, commissioned, that we got very early this morning, about 5 a.m. but the preliminary evidence is pretty consistent with what i've seen throughout my career, you know? there's a tendency to sort of caricature and stigmatize voters of devout faith and sort of suggest that they live in trailer parks, and they're poor, not educated and easy to command, and they cling to their guns and their religion, and they vote on gay marriage and abortion. not true. if you look at the evangelicals who voted yesterday, they voted on the economy and jobs by the exact same percentage that the entire electorate did. to put it in biblical terms, it rains on the righteous and the unrighteous alike. so evangelicals and faithful catholics are underwater on their mortgages. they're also struggling. they're trying to
important foreign policy has become to them and particularly their strong support for the state of israel. i wouldn't say every mailing we send, just about every mailing we sent out mentioned either obama removing jerusalem from the capital of israel and reinserted it or mentioned his call for israel to return to 67 border or mentioned the fact that his administration had slow walked sanctions against iran. those issues have real resonance among them. >> jonathan is one of washington's most thoughtful journalists. he's been covering this steek or it for a long time, and thank you, ralph, for your excellents. he's the money and politics report enand the past president of the national prez club. what did you see yesterday what does it mean for the country and. >> well, in 2010, we saw the secret money in the races took control of the senate and house. and all service said, it's going to be a foreshadow in the 2012. it wasn't. obama was able to raise as much money with romney. romney had help with the super political action committees and outside groups. the money was even. obama wasn't swamped
on some of the foreign-policy stuffy has espoused and may disagree with him on that, and that's fine, but he engages you in a debate of ideas around some really strong principles, like the constitution. ron paul will estimate bridget still be a strong player. his son will be a very important voice in the next year or so. i get it. my style is not necessarily the warmest for some conservatives who like the it straight laced stand in the background. i thought of the chairmanship needed to be a vibrant part of the political process. that meant putting it out on the street. that meant doing some shows that were not necessarily traditional for the rnc chairman to do. i just felt very strongly, and i still do, that the power does not rest down here but arrests out in america in the streets. you saw this happen again in this election. it was all race centralized back in washington because we will tell you how to do it because we know best. the reason they hired me was to come in and break that up. some did not like that, whoever else down in other parts of the country and that's fine. the g
. followed by prime minister david cameron's spetch on foreign policy at the annual lord mayor 's man quet. this will be the third time speaking before the banquet since becoming prime minister in 2010. join us for his remarks at 3:30 p.m. eastern. and then later at georgetown university, musician and activist bono talks about social enterprise and social movements like his project red campaign. our coverage begins at 6:00 p.m. eastern. now a discussion about the results of the 2012 election with media research president brent bozell, coordinator for the tea party patriots and president of the susan b. anthony list. from the press club, this is about 40 minutes. >> good afternoon. thank you for coming. my name is richard vigory, chairman of the conservative.q.com. i will speak for a few minutes and introduce five nationally known, recognized conservative leaders. and we will each talk for a little bit and then we will open it for q & a. battle to take over the republican party begins today. and the failed republican leadership should resign. out of last night's disaster comes good news, ho
a foreign policy legacy that he didn't have the political capital to do in his first term. if i were the obama administration, i would appoint bill clinton as a middle east peace envoy. he has credibility both on the israeli street and in the arab world with the camp david accord s and with the clinton global initiative. we, as americans, the united nations has to get involved. we have to send a message to both israel and palestine that there's absolutely no military violence solution to the israeli/palestinian conflict. it can only be a peaceful and political one. >>> today's talk back question, should [ male announcer ] with 160 more miles per tank, the distances aren't getting shorter. ♪ the trucks are going farther. the new 2013 ram 1500. ♪ with the best-in-class fuel economy. engineered to move heaven and earth. ♪ guts. glory. ram. . >>> now is your chance to talk back on one of the big stories of the day. the question for you this morning, should politicians have a mandatory retirement age? it was a simple question, if you're 27. or maybe those over 50 are way too sensiti
republican strategy? they are social, economic, and foreign policy, fully embracing each one. what we had was one wobbly leg with about $1 billion from the republican side from the top of the ticket and affecting every other senate race in the country because of that influence. when fully engaged, each of those policy areas, a real mandate is created, and there is a resonance that brings public policy leaders into office so those areas can be implemented, without fully engaging on each of those areas and social policy, we leave the votes on the table every single time. what we had was a factor truth on social issues on one side but a full embrace of the war on social issues on the other side. obama have launched a war over abortion and the life issue. therefore, he got to completely decide what the issue was, and what is it? rape. abortion and rape in the minds of many voters, because the debate was not fully engage. his weaknesses, is extreme positions on late storm abortions -- late term abortions, i'm not saving children born after a failed of abortion, none of these were explored in a
through foreign policy magazine, tom ricks, author of "the generals." not everything that you found is necessarily that great about modern day generals today. >> before we go there, start with the model general. you say the model general was general george marshall who gave his generals a few months to succeed, die or be relieved. >> that was accountability. that was the way they worked in world war ii. you get out there and if you can't do the job, we will get rid of you. 155 division commanders in the army in world war ii. of the guys who commanded, 16 were fired. what -- it was a darwinian process. very hard-nosed, not gentle. and they moved up guys who could succeed which is why we know names today like ridgway, gavin and eisenhower. eisenhower began 1940 as lieutenant colonel, executive officer of an infantry regiment. marshall reached out and said that's who you need to be supreme allied commander. >> how did marshall rise the way he rose without going to battle. having the battle scars of world war i or world war ii. >> it was interesting. marshall didn't know him particularl
information with those of us who are supposed to make critical foreign-policy decisions in the budget process, very unwilling. this is another case of that. i was struck by this that you mean to tell me that the head of the cia uses gmail to committee approved it struck me that i was concerned about this. i see that coming, and apparently he has agreed to testify. everybody should testify and provide as much openness ans possible. >> some of your colleagues on the senate side are talking about making a deal working with democrats on a compromise. what do you make of those efforts, and how far are you willing to go to strike the immigration deal with the democrats? >> that is a good question, and i would have been surprised if i did not hear it. i have seen a bit of a pattern over the years of people coming into this congress and taking a look at the immigration issue, thinking they have the negotiation skills to resolve one of the most complicated and convoluted and far-reaching issues that i have seen in this congress. there is not a simple solution to this. each time there's a proposal that
administrations to share information with those of us that are supposed to make critical foreign policy decisions and the budget process. very unwilling, and certainly this is another case of the. but i was struck as well that, you need to tell me the head of the cia uses gmail? [inaudible] >> to communicate? it just struck me that i'm very concerned about the. and, obviously, there will be some areas into this but i see this coming, and apparently he has agreed to testify, as he should, like everybody involved should be testifying in his and provide as much openness as possible. i look forward to the committee taking a lead on that. [inaudible] >> some of your colleagues on ssi, senate republicans are time of making a deal with with democrats to find a compromise. first of all, what do you make of those efforts? second, how far are you willing to go to to strike an immigration deal with democrats? >> well, that is a good question and i wouldn't have been surprised if i didn't hear it. i think that, i seen a bit of a pattern over the years of people coming into this congress and taking a look at
have spoken on this floor about excessive government spending, it's time to look at the cost of foreign wars before we start cutting domestic programs that our very own people need and they need them to survive. it's just not progressives like me who believe we need a change in policy, mr. speaker. there is a clear consensus among the american people. they agree that this military occupation is bad for america, bad for afghanistan and bad for the cause of peace and stability around the world. i think it was pretty telling that during the recent campaign even the republican candidate for president ended up supporting a withdrawal of troops by 2014, but in my opinion that's not nearly soon enough. . now that the presidential campaign is over, we must accelerate the timetable and end this war as soon as it is possible and safe. every remaining day we have troops on the ground is another day that gives strength to the very, treatmentists we are trying to defeat. the time has come to invest in afghanistan the right way, with humanitarian and civilian support, rather than military force. it's
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)

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